Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Home farm Land





I guess it’s too late
to live on a farm.

As if I could buy a house!
Let alone land.

A place of my own– 
is what my friend sighed,

our someday dream,
our loftiest goal.


Today again I paid
to learn, watching

refugees sit and wait
for their bus, and asked


the doctor what the term
really means–


she couldn’t state
exact qualifications, 


just that for some
recognized reason,

a person had to leave
their homeland.


But, had a home,
and have a new home, here.


Or housing, at least.
More stable than those

that exist in doorways,
or under the bridge


in tents that spring up
like mushrooms when it rains.



And how they also pay,
if not in money. Life




is costly. At some point
we all get priced out–

a roof, a room, a house,
a home. When you’ve got nothing

to trade, to leverage, to sell–
it’s too late to live on a farm.

All that’s left is to work
in the fields that someone else owns.




Home farm Land





I guess it’s too late
to live on a farm.

As if I could buy a house!
Let alone land.

A place of my own– 
is what my friend sighed,

our someday dream,
our loftiest goal.


Today again I paid
to learn, watching

refugees sit and wait
for their bus, and asked


the doctor what the term
really means–


she couldn’t state
exact qualifications, 


just that for some
recognized reason,

a person had to leave
their homeland.


But, had a home,
and have a new home, here.


Or housing, at least.
More stable than those

that exist in doorways,
or under the bridge


in tents that spring up
like mushrooms when it rains.



And how they also pay,
if not in money. Life




is costly. At some point
we all get priced out–

a roof, a room, a house,
a home. When you’ve got nothing

to trade, to leverage, to sell–
it’s too late to live on a farm.

All that’s left is to work
in the fields that someone else owns.




Panamax Wins Fintech Innovation Award 2015 for MobiFin

Panamax Wins Fintech Innovation Award 2015 for MobiFin

Panamax Wins Fintech Innovation Award 2015 for MobiFin

Panamax Wins Fintech Innovation Award 2015 for MobiFin

Allied World Completes the Acquisitions of the Hong Kong and Singapore Operations of RSA

Allied World Completes the Acquisitions of the Hong Kong and Singapore Operations of RSA

SunEdison and TerraForm Power Interconnect Four Solar Farms in North Carolina Totaling 26 Megawatts

SunEdison and TerraForm Power Interconnect Four Solar Farms in North Carolina Totaling 26 Megawatts

SunEdison and TerraForm Power Interconnect Four Solar Farms in North Carolina Totaling 26 Megawatts

SunEdison and TerraForm Power Interconnect Four Solar Farms in North Carolina Totaling 26 Megawatts

Allied World Completes the Acquisitions of the Hong Kong and Singapore Operations of RSA

Allied World Completes the Acquisitions of the Hong Kong and Singapore Operations of RSA

The world’s largest luxury watch investment vehicle The Watch Fund is nominated against HSBC for WealthBriefingAsia Singapore Awards 2015

The world’s largest luxury watch investment vehicle The Watch Fund is nominated against HSBC for WealthBriefingAsia Singapore Awards 2015

The world’s largest luxury watch investment vehicle The Watch Fund is nominated against HSBC for WealthBriefingAsia Singapore Awards 2015

The world’s largest luxury watch investment vehicle The Watch Fund is nominated against HSBC for WealthBriefingAsia Singapore Awards 2015

Monday, March 30, 2015

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Grace Myu: Malaysia Beauty, Fashion, Lifestyle Blogger: My Monthly Visit to BeeQnails, SS2 Petaling Jaya

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Grace Myu: Malaysia Beauty, Fashion, Lifestyle Blogger: "Time to Enjoy Life" at Taiwan Travel Fair 2015!

Grace Myu: Malaysia Beauty, Fashion, Lifestyle Blogger: "Time to Enjoy Life" at Taiwan Travel Fair 2015!: Eat, shop & go on two wheels in Taiwan! Before that grab the best travel deals at Taiwan Travel Fair Remember just awhile ago...

Grace Myu: Malaysia Beauty, Fashion, Lifestyle Blogger: "Time to Enjoy Life" at Taiwan Travel Fair 2015!

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BRIAN'S SEE-CRET: DKNY Spring/Summer 2015 Fashion Show @ Pavilion Pi...

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Herma's Blog: REPENT OR PERISH. / BEKEER OF KOM OM.

Herma's Blog: REPENT OR PERISH. / BEKEER OF KOM OM.: Monday 30 March 2015.  WORD OF THE DAY: [Matthew 24:35] "Heaven and earth will pass away, but My words will never pass away." MESS...

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Sunday, March 29, 2015

Toshiba to Supply Four Power Generators and Equipment for Hydroelectric Plant in Myanmar

Toshiba to Supply Four Power Generators and Equipment for Hydroelectric Plant in Myanmar

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KPMG Announces New Strategic Collaboration with Microsoft

KPMG Announces New Strategic Collaboration with Microsoft

KPMG Announces New Strategic Collaboration with Microsoft

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Senegal, The Philippines, and Uruguay Make Major Strides Towards Universal Access to Reproductive Health

Senegal, The Philippines, and Uruguay Make Major Strides Towards Universal Access to Reproductive Health

Senegal, The Philippines, and Uruguay Make Major Strides Towards Universal Access to Reproductive Health

Senegal, The Philippines, and Uruguay Make Major Strides Towards Universal Access to Reproductive Health

Majestic Australia win fifth World Cup

Australia win fifth World Cup









It had been the World Cup of short balls. On a flat MCG deck, it had seemed bounce would be the bowlers' major ally. But so cocksure were Australia's pace phalanx of their quality, they left nothing to the vagaries of the surface, firing balls full, fast and straight to deliver Australia a seven-wicket win and its fifth World Cup in comprehensive fashion.

Mitchell Starc and Mitchell Johnson shared five wickets, having sent down several spells of searing, swinging yorkers between them, and James Faulkner - slower but cannier than the other left-armers - claimed three scalps for himself. In all, eight wickets fell to full deliveries as New Zealand were felled for 183 in the 45th over.

There were early nerves in the chase, particularly when Aaron Finch fell in the second over, but Michael Clarke and Steven Smith stroked fluent half-centuries to run the target down inside 34 overs. Clarke, the departing captain, had a standing ovation when he left the field after his sparkling 74 from 72. Smith, his most likely successor, stayed at the crease to hit the last ball of the World Cup through deep square leg for four.

All through the tournament batting sides have broken games open in the final 15 overs of their innings, but Australia bent history in a different direction by blowing through New Zealand's middle order and tail during the death overs. New Zealand might have harboured hopes of a score of 250, perhaps even 300, when Grant Elliott and Ross Taylor's 111-run stand had repaired early damage. But when the batting Powerplay came on at the 35th over, Faulkner claimed two scalps from three balls to send the opposition into a nosedive.


His slower ball first took Taylor's outside edge en route to a diving Brad Haddin, before two balls later, Corey Anderson missed a straight yorker that made a mess of his stumps. Luke Ronchi was caught sharply at slip off Starc early next over, and Daniel Vettori castled by Johnson in the 41st. Elliott had played smoothly for his 82 ball 83, but was forced into a premature attack by the carnage at the other end, and was dismissed by a now-combative Faulkner, before a Glenn Maxwell direct hit found a languid Tim Southee short of his crease to end the innings.

In the end it was a final almost completely devoid of David v Goliath romance. New Zealand had captured neutral support partly because of the spirit with which they had played this World Cup, but all through the final, there were touches of arrogance from Australia to go with their overpowering skill and strength. Brad Haddin's sniping from behind the stumps was nearly incessant, several New Zealand batsmen had words shot at them as they departed, and the David Warner blows that kick-started Australia's chase smacked of disdain.

Luck too, favoured 21st century pragmatism over the fairytale. Daniel Vettori, the final's second oldest man, injured himself early in the second innings and could only pivot gingerly through his five overs. Brendon McCullum had attacked relentlessly in the field right through this campaign, but the moment Warner's assault bent his resolve out of shape, the next ball flew through second slip, where moments before a fielder had stood. Then the final slap in the face in the 15th over: Matt Henry's ball dribbled onto Smith's stumps, but did not dislodge the zing bails.







McCullum's World Cup final innings was a high-octane blur. Starc bowled fast and full, straightening the ball only a touch, but menacingly late. McCullum swung straight at the first, missed, then missed again when he advanced next ball. The third inswinging yorker clattered into the base of off stump. Starc took off toward square leg in celebration, the MCG's mighty roar in his ears. McCullum left his side at 1 for 1, having been comprehensively outdone.

The early wicket helped weigh the New Zealand batsmen down, but Martin Guptill and Kane Williamson were also muted by impeccable pace bowling from Starc, Josh Hazlewood, and later Johnson. They collected only two fours and a top-edged six in the first 10 overs. Having averaged more than seven an over through that period in the tournament, New Zealand were 31 for 1 when the field restrictions expired. Australia's lively ground fielding ensured even rare loose balls were punished minimally.



Australia grew red hot with the scalps of Guptill and Williamson - the former inexplicably missing an innocuous Maxwell offbreak, the latter spooning a return catch to Johnson in the 13th over. Elliott and Taylor combined to fight the fire, poking the first few runs through the offside with hard hands before Clarke slipped in a few overs from his supporting bowlers to inadvertently ease the pair in.



Elliott eventually took another top-edged six and laced a few through the covers to move to a strike rate of around 100. He was the only New Zealand batsman to appear comfortable at the crease while Taylor plodded at the other end. All through the partnership, Australia's quicks would earn thick edges, but these flew fast and high over the infield. Third man was a productive area for the batsmen.


Trent Boult raised hopes of an upset when in a scorching spell, he caught and bowled Finch to leave Australia 2 for 1. But Warner soon propelled Australia through the early overs, and Australia were not shaken after that. Warner was caught attempting a second pulled four for 45 off Henry, but Smith and Clarke combined to make 112 stress-free runs together to effectively close out the Cup.


Clarke was composed to begin with, but a brace of late boundaries - including four consecutive fours off Tim Southee's 31st over - he sent his side hurtling towards the trophy. He was out soon after for a 72-ball 74, but Smith capped a dream summer by completing his fifty the same over, then sealed the result soon after.


When New Zealand were all out for 183, the 1983 World Cup final was invoked. When Vettori began hobbling in what was probably his final international, comparisons with Muttiah Muralitharan's plight in the 2011 final were made. Australia's 1999 annihilation of Pakistan came closest to matching the narrative of this game. In the end, the final perhaps fit a 2015 tournament that has seen precious few close contests.


This is historical over from Henry fast bowler of NZ...here is coming....



"33.1
Henry to Smith, FOUR
,
short and pulled away with a whirl of those rubber wrists! There she blows, the winning runs fittingly from Smith's bat - Australia win the World Cup final by seven wickets, New Zealand were just swept aside in the end. Smith has been one of Australia's leading lights and he had guided them home at the G"




9.45pm: The trophy has been held aloft and, after a six-week journey, Australia are crowned World Champions. They're off on a victory lap, which will take a while across the wide expanse of the MCG. The emotion briefly welled up again in Clarke when he paid tribute to Hughes; Australia play their cricket close to the edge but Clarke, in particular, makes them a likeable, human bunch. Both captains spoke with humility and praise for each other at the end and both sides have played a huge part in making this tournament memorable.


We've had a blast, haven't we? The batsmen certainly did, though the Man of the Final and Man of the Tournament were bowlers. We will remember spells from Mitchell Starc and Trent Boult, Tim Southee and Wahab Riaz for as long as we do those innings of fury from Martin Guptill, AB de Villiers and Glenn Maxwell. Not to mention the contributions made from all across the cricketing world, from Shaiman Anwar and William Porterfield, Shapoor Zadran and Sean Williams.


The final, in the end, was something of a waltz but we'll not forget Baz and his Black Caps charging through the competiton with an aggressive approach that will forever leave its mark. The G got the result it wanted, however. We'll have plenty of reaction, appreciation and analysis coming up on the site, so stick around. It's been a pleasure and a privilege to bring you the action, we'll be back again in four years' time (possibly before then, too). From Sid and myself and all the guys and girls in New Zealand and Australia, India, England and the US, thanks for joining in and see you again soon. Bye!


9.25pm: Presentations, one last time this World Cup...


Mention of farewells for Sangakkara and Jayawardene, Misbah and Afridi, Clarke. Maybe Vettori too. Up come the officials for their medals, then the New Zealand players. Here's New Zealand captain Brendon McCullum:


It's been one hell of a ride for us, right the way through, we played some outstanding cricket. We ran into an outstanding team in Australia, they continue to set the standard. Michael Clarke bows out on a high note, they deserved to win. [Early dismissal] Probably unfolded not as planned, but we got ourselves back in the game at 3 for 150. With 180, you still dare to dream, could have ended up differently with a couple of things going our way. This is what you ask for as a cricketer, we've had the opportunity. We've forged memories and friendships that will last forever. Didn't lift the trophy but no regrets, the brand of cricket we've played and we walk away with our heads held high. It's the greatest time of our lives and that's how we tried to play the game, with a free spirit and heart. Still think we can be very proud of our achievements in this tournament."


There's a big cheer when it's announced that Sachin Tendulkar will present Man of the Match award. It is goes to James Faulkner: "Pretty amazing feeling, in front of 90,000 at the MCG. We've had an amazing journey the last couple of years. [Impact in the Powerplay] The skipper tosses you the ball and it works out like that sometimes. I thought I might not be here today, so this is an amazing feeling."


Man of the Tournament now, and it is Mitchell Starc, the master of the reverse-swinging yorker, heir to Wasim Akram, who picked up 22 wickets: "Amazing tournament, some outstanding performances but to cap it off. NZ have set the standard all tournament but we led it home. I've worked really hard for a number of months now, a few series ago we sat down and to see it come to fruition it's been phenomenal. Little lucky, it was a plan Craig and I had but to see it executed. Brendon's been fantastic all tournament. The fans have been fantastic, to win in front of this many people, there's nothing like it. Going to enjoy this one for now."


Finally, the triumphant captain, on his final day in the job, Michael Clarke: "Over the moon, what a tournament, Brendon and NZ deserve a lot of credit, always a tough team to beat, whenever we play them in any sport - so well done to Baz and his team, especially personally, he had an amazing performance. Thanks to every Australian and cricket supporter out there who've been behind us. The team and support staff, the support I've had since coming back into the team, they deserve to stand there with the trophy. Said we were ready mentally and we managed to get it all together physically. [No23 shirt?] Might give it back to Warney... Haven't given it much though, time is right to walk away from one-day cricket, I'll still be playing Test cricket. [Black arm bands] It's got PH on it, I'll wear it every time I play for Australia. Been a really tough few months and everyone would say we played this World Cup with 16 players. Tonight is dedicated to our little brother. Hughesy used to party as well as any of them. We're really proud, it's a wonderful achievement, to win in our own backyard in front of family and friends."


9.10pm: The men in yellow stream out on to the pitch, engulfing Smith. Big brother has prevailed and Australia can forget about 1992 - they've won the World Cup on home soil. For the fourth time in five, too. After the disappointment of 2011, they are a mean one-day machine again. New Zealand won a whole lot as well at this tournament, in terms of admiration and affection from beyond their own shores, but they came up short across the ditch. David Warner says he has lost his voice, as unlikely as it seems. "Thanks to everyone who has come out to support us, credit to you guys."


"They've been fantastic over the six weeks and the support we've had is unbelievable," says Darren Lehmann, of his players, moments before he gets an ice bucket dumped over him. "That's why I love them," he adds. Aaron Finch is chuffed to win in front of his home crowd, as you would expect. And Shane Warne has Smiffy alongside him: "Unbelievable feeling. We said we wanted to play out best games at the end of the tournament. To win three down is amazing... The bowlers set it up for us. Thanks for everyone coming out." He's with Mitchell Starc, whose spearing of Brendon McCullum after three balls was a huge tone-setter in this game. It's "topped off the summer," he says.


The Australians are all out there, on the pitch, having microphones shoved in front of them. Shane Watson has a word for New Zealand: "They've been the form side of world cricket the last six months, Brendon McCullum has done an incredible job, they have match-winners through their team. We're incredibly glad to have won." New Zealand, of course, had already laid to rest 1992 and, as Martin Crowe wrote beforehand, this final was always going to be the "perfect ending". But you can be sure they would have preferred to win.


Australia will be receiving the trophy shortly, their fifth World Cup. Two years ago, they were being whitewashed in India and going out of the Champions Trophy without a win. Lehmann has helped recapture their mojo, they'll certainly celebrate under the southern cross tonight. And at the end of the Australian summer, after the pain of Phillip Hughes' passing in November, this will also be a cathartic triumph.





Majestic Australia win fifth World Cup

Australia win fifth World Cup









It had been the World Cup of short balls. On a flat MCG deck, it had seemed bounce would be the bowlers' major ally. But so cocksure were Australia's pace phalanx of their quality, they left nothing to the vagaries of the surface, firing balls full, fast and straight to deliver Australia a seven-wicket win and its fifth World Cup in comprehensive fashion.

Mitchell Starc and Mitchell Johnson shared five wickets, having sent down several spells of searing, swinging yorkers between them, and James Faulkner - slower but cannier than the other left-armers - claimed three scalps for himself. In all, eight wickets fell to full deliveries as New Zealand were felled for 183 in the 45th over.

There were early nerves in the chase, particularly when Aaron Finch fell in the second over, but Michael Clarke and Steven Smith stroked fluent half-centuries to run the target down inside 34 overs. Clarke, the departing captain, had a standing ovation when he left the field after his sparkling 74 from 72. Smith, his most likely successor, stayed at the crease to hit the last ball of the World Cup through deep square leg for four.

All through the tournament batting sides have broken games open in the final 15 overs of their innings, but Australia bent history in a different direction by blowing through New Zealand's middle order and tail during the death overs. New Zealand might have harboured hopes of a score of 250, perhaps even 300, when Grant Elliott and Ross Taylor's 111-run stand had repaired early damage. But when the batting Powerplay came on at the 35th over, Faulkner claimed two scalps from three balls to send the opposition into a nosedive.


His slower ball first took Taylor's outside edge en route to a diving Brad Haddin, before two balls later, Corey Anderson missed a straight yorker that made a mess of his stumps. Luke Ronchi was caught sharply at slip off Starc early next over, and Daniel Vettori castled by Johnson in the 41st. Elliott had played smoothly for his 82 ball 83, but was forced into a premature attack by the carnage at the other end, and was dismissed by a now-combative Faulkner, before a Glenn Maxwell direct hit found a languid Tim Southee short of his crease to end the innings.

In the end it was a final almost completely devoid of David v Goliath romance. New Zealand had captured neutral support partly because of the spirit with which they had played this World Cup, but all through the final, there were touches of arrogance from Australia to go with their overpowering skill and strength. Brad Haddin's sniping from behind the stumps was nearly incessant, several New Zealand batsmen had words shot at them as they departed, and the David Warner blows that kick-started Australia's chase smacked of disdain.

Luck too, favoured 21st century pragmatism over the fairytale. Daniel Vettori, the final's second oldest man, injured himself early in the second innings and could only pivot gingerly through his five overs. Brendon McCullum had attacked relentlessly in the field right through this campaign, but the moment Warner's assault bent his resolve out of shape, the next ball flew through second slip, where moments before a fielder had stood. Then the final slap in the face in the 15th over: Matt Henry's ball dribbled onto Smith's stumps, but did not dislodge the zing bails.







McCullum's World Cup final innings was a high-octane blur. Starc bowled fast and full, straightening the ball only a touch, but menacingly late. McCullum swung straight at the first, missed, then missed again when he advanced next ball. The third inswinging yorker clattered into the base of off stump. Starc took off toward square leg in celebration, the MCG's mighty roar in his ears. McCullum left his side at 1 for 1, having been comprehensively outdone.

The early wicket helped weigh the New Zealand batsmen down, but Martin Guptill and Kane Williamson were also muted by impeccable pace bowling from Starc, Josh Hazlewood, and later Johnson. They collected only two fours and a top-edged six in the first 10 overs. Having averaged more than seven an over through that period in the tournament, New Zealand were 31 for 1 when the field restrictions expired. Australia's lively ground fielding ensured even rare loose balls were punished minimally.



Australia grew red hot with the scalps of Guptill and Williamson - the former inexplicably missing an innocuous Maxwell offbreak, the latter spooning a return catch to Johnson in the 13th over. Elliott and Taylor combined to fight the fire, poking the first few runs through the offside with hard hands before Clarke slipped in a few overs from his supporting bowlers to inadvertently ease the pair in.



Elliott eventually took another top-edged six and laced a few through the covers to move to a strike rate of around 100. He was the only New Zealand batsman to appear comfortable at the crease while Taylor plodded at the other end. All through the partnership, Australia's quicks would earn thick edges, but these flew fast and high over the infield. Third man was a productive area for the batsmen.


Trent Boult raised hopes of an upset when in a scorching spell, he caught and bowled Finch to leave Australia 2 for 1. But Warner soon propelled Australia through the early overs, and Australia were not shaken after that. Warner was caught attempting a second pulled four for 45 off Henry, but Smith and Clarke combined to make 112 stress-free runs together to effectively close out the Cup.


Clarke was composed to begin with, but a brace of late boundaries - including four consecutive fours off Tim Southee's 31st over - he sent his side hurtling towards the trophy. He was out soon after for a 72-ball 74, but Smith capped a dream summer by completing his fifty the same over, then sealed the result soon after.


When New Zealand were all out for 183, the 1983 World Cup final was invoked. When Vettori began hobbling in what was probably his final international, comparisons with Muttiah Muralitharan's plight in the 2011 final were made. Australia's 1999 annihilation of Pakistan came closest to matching the narrative of this game. In the end, the final perhaps fit a 2015 tournament that has seen precious few close contests.


This is historical over from Henry fast bowler of NZ...here is coming....



"33.1
Henry to Smith, FOUR
,
short and pulled away with a whirl of those rubber wrists! There she blows, the winning runs fittingly from Smith's bat - Australia win the World Cup final by seven wickets, New Zealand were just swept aside in the end. Smith has been one of Australia's leading lights and he had guided them home at the G"




9.45pm: The trophy has been held aloft and, after a six-week journey, Australia are crowned World Champions. They're off on a victory lap, which will take a while across the wide expanse of the MCG. The emotion briefly welled up again in Clarke when he paid tribute to Hughes; Australia play their cricket close to the edge but Clarke, in particular, makes them a likeable, human bunch. Both captains spoke with humility and praise for each other at the end and both sides have played a huge part in making this tournament memorable.


We've had a blast, haven't we? The batsmen certainly did, though the Man of the Final and Man of the Tournament were bowlers. We will remember spells from Mitchell Starc and Trent Boult, Tim Southee and Wahab Riaz for as long as we do those innings of fury from Martin Guptill, AB de Villiers and Glenn Maxwell. Not to mention the contributions made from all across the cricketing world, from Shaiman Anwar and William Porterfield, Shapoor Zadran and Sean Williams.


The final, in the end, was something of a waltz but we'll not forget Baz and his Black Caps charging through the competiton with an aggressive approach that will forever leave its mark. The G got the result it wanted, however. We'll have plenty of reaction, appreciation and analysis coming up on the site, so stick around. It's been a pleasure and a privilege to bring you the action, we'll be back again in four years' time (possibly before then, too). From Sid and myself and all the guys and girls in New Zealand and Australia, India, England and the US, thanks for joining in and see you again soon. Bye!


9.25pm: Presentations, one last time this World Cup...


Mention of farewells for Sangakkara and Jayawardene, Misbah and Afridi, Clarke. Maybe Vettori too. Up come the officials for their medals, then the New Zealand players. Here's New Zealand captain Brendon McCullum:


It's been one hell of a ride for us, right the way through, we played some outstanding cricket. We ran into an outstanding team in Australia, they continue to set the standard. Michael Clarke bows out on a high note, they deserved to win. [Early dismissal] Probably unfolded not as planned, but we got ourselves back in the game at 3 for 150. With 180, you still dare to dream, could have ended up differently with a couple of things going our way. This is what you ask for as a cricketer, we've had the opportunity. We've forged memories and friendships that will last forever. Didn't lift the trophy but no regrets, the brand of cricket we've played and we walk away with our heads held high. It's the greatest time of our lives and that's how we tried to play the game, with a free spirit and heart. Still think we can be very proud of our achievements in this tournament."


There's a big cheer when it's announced that Sachin Tendulkar will present Man of the Match award. It is goes to James Faulkner: "Pretty amazing feeling, in front of 90,000 at the MCG. We've had an amazing journey the last couple of years. [Impact in the Powerplay] The skipper tosses you the ball and it works out like that sometimes. I thought I might not be here today, so this is an amazing feeling."


Man of the Tournament now, and it is Mitchell Starc, the master of the reverse-swinging yorker, heir to Wasim Akram, who picked up 22 wickets: "Amazing tournament, some outstanding performances but to cap it off. NZ have set the standard all tournament but we led it home. I've worked really hard for a number of months now, a few series ago we sat down and to see it come to fruition it's been phenomenal. Little lucky, it was a plan Craig and I had but to see it executed. Brendon's been fantastic all tournament. The fans have been fantastic, to win in front of this many people, there's nothing like it. Going to enjoy this one for now."


Finally, the triumphant captain, on his final day in the job, Michael Clarke: "Over the moon, what a tournament, Brendon and NZ deserve a lot of credit, always a tough team to beat, whenever we play them in any sport - so well done to Baz and his team, especially personally, he had an amazing performance. Thanks to every Australian and cricket supporter out there who've been behind us. The team and support staff, the support I've had since coming back into the team, they deserve to stand there with the trophy. Said we were ready mentally and we managed to get it all together physically. [No23 shirt?] Might give it back to Warney... Haven't given it much though, time is right to walk away from one-day cricket, I'll still be playing Test cricket. [Black arm bands] It's got PH on it, I'll wear it every time I play for Australia. Been a really tough few months and everyone would say we played this World Cup with 16 players. Tonight is dedicated to our little brother. Hughesy used to party as well as any of them. We're really proud, it's a wonderful achievement, to win in our own backyard in front of family and friends."


9.10pm: The men in yellow stream out on to the pitch, engulfing Smith. Big brother has prevailed and Australia can forget about 1992 - they've won the World Cup on home soil. For the fourth time in five, too. After the disappointment of 2011, they are a mean one-day machine again. New Zealand won a whole lot as well at this tournament, in terms of admiration and affection from beyond their own shores, but they came up short across the ditch. David Warner says he has lost his voice, as unlikely as it seems. "Thanks to everyone who has come out to support us, credit to you guys."


"They've been fantastic over the six weeks and the support we've had is unbelievable," says Darren Lehmann, of his players, moments before he gets an ice bucket dumped over him. "That's why I love them," he adds. Aaron Finch is chuffed to win in front of his home crowd, as you would expect. And Shane Warne has Smiffy alongside him: "Unbelievable feeling. We said we wanted to play out best games at the end of the tournament. To win three down is amazing... The bowlers set it up for us. Thanks for everyone coming out." He's with Mitchell Starc, whose spearing of Brendon McCullum after three balls was a huge tone-setter in this game. It's "topped off the summer," he says.


The Australians are all out there, on the pitch, having microphones shoved in front of them. Shane Watson has a word for New Zealand: "They've been the form side of world cricket the last six months, Brendon McCullum has done an incredible job, they have match-winners through their team. We're incredibly glad to have won." New Zealand, of course, had already laid to rest 1992 and, as Martin Crowe wrote beforehand, this final was always going to be the "perfect ending". But you can be sure they would have preferred to win.


Australia will be receiving the trophy shortly, their fifth World Cup. Two years ago, they were being whitewashed in India and going out of the Champions Trophy without a win. Lehmann has helped recapture their mojo, they'll certainly celebrate under the southern cross tonight. And at the end of the Australian summer, after the pain of Phillip Hughes' passing in November, this will also be a cathartic triumph.





Friday, March 27, 2015

Research and Markets: Global and Chinese 3D Television Industry Analysis and Forecasts 2010-2020 with Feasibility Study for Future Projects

Research and Markets: Global and Chinese 3D Television Industry Analysis and Forecasts 2010-2020 with Feasibility Study for Future Projects

Research and Markets: Global and Chinese 3D Television Industry Analysis and Forecasts 2010-2020 with Feasibility Study for Future Projects

Research and Markets: Global and Chinese 3D Television Industry Analysis and Forecasts 2010-2020 with Feasibility Study for Future Projects

Technavio Says Initiatives Like “Digital India” Are Set to Transform the Smart Classroom Market in India

Technavio Says Initiatives Like “Digital India” Are Set to Transform the Smart Classroom Market in India

Technavio Says Initiatives Like “Digital India” Are Set to Transform the Smart Classroom Market in India

Technavio Says Initiatives Like “Digital India” Are Set to Transform the Smart Classroom Market in India

Rates PA Commonwealth Financing Auth’s $198MM Rev Bonds ‘A+'; Outlook Stable

Rates PA Commonwealth Financing Auth’s $198MM Rev Bonds ‘A+'; Outlook Stable

Rates PA Commonwealth Financing Auth’s $198MM Rev Bonds ‘A+'; Outlook Stable

Rates PA Commonwealth Financing Auth’s $198MM Rev Bonds ‘A+'; Outlook Stable

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Job 30451: Seeking an English French Search Engine Evalautor

Job 30451: Seeking an English French Search Engine Evalautor

Job 30451: Seeking an English French Search Engine Evalautor

Job 30451: Seeking an English French Search Engine Evalautor

Job 30446: English to Vietnamese: Lionbridge Technologies Smart Crowd

Job 30446: English to Vietnamese: Lionbridge Technologies Smart Crowd

NCKU International Business Programs Open for Admission until March 30

NCKU International Business Programs Open for Admission until March 30

NCKU International Business Programs Open for Admission until March 30

NCKU International Business Programs Open for Admission until March 30

Job 30446: English to Vietnamese: Lionbridge Technologies Smart Crowd

Job 30446: English to Vietnamese: Lionbridge Technologies Smart Crowd

Japan Genitourinary Drugs Market Insights 2015

Research and Markets: Japan Genitourinary Drugs Market Insights 2015

Japan Genitourinary Drugs Market Insights 2015

Research and Markets: Japan Genitourinary Drugs Market Insights 2015

Microsoft wants US suppliers to give employees paid time off

Microsoft wants US suppliers to give employees paid time off

Microsoft wants US suppliers to give employees paid time off

Microsoft wants US suppliers to give employees paid time off

NTT Communications Launches Prepaid SIM Vending Machines for Foreign Tourists at AQUA CITY ODAIBA and New Kansai International Airport

NTT Communications Launches Prepaid SIM Vending Machines for Foreign Tourists at AQUA CITY ODAIBA and New Kansai International Airport

NTT Communications Launches Prepaid SIM Vending Machines for Foreign Tourists at AQUA CITY ODAIBA and New Kansai International Airport

NTT Communications Launches Prepaid SIM Vending Machines for Foreign Tourists at AQUA CITY ODAIBA and New Kansai International Airport

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

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Lose Your Fat | Weight Loss Tips | Fat Lose Exercise | Lose Fat Fast | Lose Fat Belly: Lose Your Fat - Healthy Weight Loss Tips

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Lose Your Fat | Weight Loss Tips | Fat Lose Exercise | Lose Fat Fast | Lose Fat Belly: Lose Your Fat - Healthy Weight Loss Tips: You can get a slim and perfect body too! All you have to do is lose your fat. You might be thinking that is it very difficult to get ...

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Fat Burning Furnace: Fat loss diet That work:         Weight loss and fat loss have become synonymous in most circles. However, these terms can be very different. A diet can cause weig...

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Fat Burning Furnace: How to lose belly fat quickly-5 easy and effective...:        Many individuals are searching for how to lose belly fat quickly. The main reason for this is that many people today live stress...

How Saudi Arabia Will Kick Its Oil Habit Read more:






Saudi Arabia, the Middle East’s biggest economy and the world’s largest oil producer, is running out of its black gold. Some estimate that the wells will run dry as early as 2030. That’s a huge deal. Oil revenue reached $312 billion this year and accounts for almost half the economy and 90 percent of export revenue. It also makes the kingdom the Persian Gulf’s economic powerhouse.

That’s why diversification is no longer a luxury. Opening its notoriously insulated stock exchange to foreign investors and investing in solar power, poultry, dairy, petrochemicals and innovative technology — these are the threads stitching together the kingdom’s safety net. Here are the companies leading the way forward: 

The Pitch: Global petrochemical leader

Size: $103.4 billion market value

CEO: Mohamed Al-Mady

Recent Moves: Recently crowned the Middle East’s big-biz king, SABIC is among the world’s largest petrochemical companies. Petrochemical usually means plastics and fertilizer, but SABIC is looking ahead with a host of new polycarbonate technologies, like solar panels, a film for touch screens and the first polycarbonate automobile wheel. Though it’s rolling back European operations, it’s venturing eagerly into the U.S., attracted by the shale oil boom. And with Saudi Arabia about to crack open its stock market to foreign investors, non-oil multinationals are poised for global prominence. Expect SABIC to receive the most lavish treatment from foreigners.

The Pitch: Leading the kingdom’s startup revolution

Size: Acquired for $16 million by SAS Holdings

Founder: Khalid Alkhudair

Recent Moves: To kick their country’s oil addiction, Saudi leaders have launched hundred-million-dollar venture funds and incubators nationwide. The goal? A knowledge-based economy by 2025. The pre-eminent career portal for Saudi women is a poster child for the kingdom’s startup offensive, not to mention female workplace empowerment. Glowork’s market is potentially tremendous: A third of women are unemployed, and because most of them are college educated, they represent a real opportunity cost. And a government cost, too, because the jobless receive $800 a month from the government — a total of $1.6 billion down the drain, according to Alkhudair. 

An oil exploration rig operated by the Saudi Arabian drilling company Saudi Aramco near Abqaiq, Saudi Arabia.
SOURCEBarry Iverson/Alamy
Saudi Aramco

The Pitch: Jolly green oil giant

Recent Moves: The Saudi government is planning an ambitious solar renaissance — the kingdom wants its energy mix to include 23 percent solar by 2030 and 39 percent by 2050. With lots of sunshine, low-cost funding and abundant space, Saudi Arabia has already developed one of the world’s cheapest solar models. Saudi Arabia might be the site of a perfect solar storm.CEO: Khalid A. Al-FalihSize: 9.5 million barrels of crude oil production daily; 54,000 employees

Saudi Aramco is poised to helm it. The state-owned behemoth and undisputed world petroleum champion was once valued at $7 trillion, almost half of the U.S. GDP ($16.8 trillion in 2013). The coming oil crunch has it staking a claim in solar and other alternative energies.

Although progress toward solar salvation has been slow, Aramco is still investing heavily in other potentially revolutionary alternative energy solutions. This month, it spearheaded a $30 million investment in San Francisco-based Siluria Technologies, which plans to produce low-cost gasoline from natural gas — for $1 per gallon.
Almarai

The Pitch: Moving Saudi Arabia from fuel to food

Size: $10.4 billion market cap; 16,000 employees

Founder: Prince Sultan bin Mohammed bin Saud Al Kabeer

Recent Moves: The region’s largest food company is in the right place at the right time. Saudi Arabia is the world’s largest importer of broiler meat, mostly chicken, to the tune of 875,000 metric tons in 2013. Domestic competitors like Almarai are ripe for growth. Already, poultry production is on the rise in the kingdom and is expected to swell 52 percent by 2018.

Almarai is showing other signs of international ambition. In partnership with PepsiCo, it launched a $345 million investment in Egypt this June, and its CEO has stated he plans to boost that figure to $560 million in five years. The funds will go toward a new juice factory, a 5,000-cow dairy farm and expanding existing facilities for Egyptian beverage firm Beyti. Drink and eat up!



Read more: OZY - Smarter, Fresher, Different

How Saudi Arabia Will Kick Its Oil Habit Read more:






Saudi Arabia, the Middle East’s biggest economy and the world’s largest oil producer, is running out of its black gold. Some estimate that the wells will run dry as early as 2030. That’s a huge deal. Oil revenue reached $312 billion this year and accounts for almost half the economy and 90 percent of export revenue. It also makes the kingdom the Persian Gulf’s economic powerhouse.

That’s why diversification is no longer a luxury. Opening its notoriously insulated stock exchange to foreign investors and investing in solar power, poultry, dairy, petrochemicals and innovative technology — these are the threads stitching together the kingdom’s safety net. Here are the companies leading the way forward: 

The Pitch: Global petrochemical leader

Size: $103.4 billion market value

CEO: Mohamed Al-Mady

Recent Moves: Recently crowned the Middle East’s big-biz king, SABIC is among the world’s largest petrochemical companies. Petrochemical usually means plastics and fertilizer, but SABIC is looking ahead with a host of new polycarbonate technologies, like solar panels, a film for touch screens and the first polycarbonate automobile wheel. Though it’s rolling back European operations, it’s venturing eagerly into the U.S., attracted by the shale oil boom. And with Saudi Arabia about to crack open its stock market to foreign investors, non-oil multinationals are poised for global prominence. Expect SABIC to receive the most lavish treatment from foreigners.

The Pitch: Leading the kingdom’s startup revolution

Size: Acquired for $16 million by SAS Holdings

Founder: Khalid Alkhudair

Recent Moves: To kick their country’s oil addiction, Saudi leaders have launched hundred-million-dollar venture funds and incubators nationwide. The goal? A knowledge-based economy by 2025. The pre-eminent career portal for Saudi women is a poster child for the kingdom’s startup offensive, not to mention female workplace empowerment. Glowork’s market is potentially tremendous: A third of women are unemployed, and because most of them are college educated, they represent a real opportunity cost. And a government cost, too, because the jobless receive $800 a month from the government — a total of $1.6 billion down the drain, according to Alkhudair. 

An oil exploration rig operated by the Saudi Arabian drilling company Saudi Aramco near Abqaiq, Saudi Arabia.
SOURCEBarry Iverson/Alamy
Saudi Aramco

The Pitch: Jolly green oil giant

Recent Moves: The Saudi government is planning an ambitious solar renaissance — the kingdom wants its energy mix to include 23 percent solar by 2030 and 39 percent by 2050. With lots of sunshine, low-cost funding and abundant space, Saudi Arabia has already developed one of the world’s cheapest solar models. Saudi Arabia might be the site of a perfect solar storm.CEO: Khalid A. Al-FalihSize: 9.5 million barrels of crude oil production daily; 54,000 employees

Saudi Aramco is poised to helm it. The state-owned behemoth and undisputed world petroleum champion was once valued at $7 trillion, almost half of the U.S. GDP ($16.8 trillion in 2013). The coming oil crunch has it staking a claim in solar and other alternative energies.

Although progress toward solar salvation has been slow, Aramco is still investing heavily in other potentially revolutionary alternative energy solutions. This month, it spearheaded a $30 million investment in San Francisco-based Siluria Technologies, which plans to produce low-cost gasoline from natural gas — for $1 per gallon.
Almarai

The Pitch: Moving Saudi Arabia from fuel to food

Size: $10.4 billion market cap; 16,000 employees

Founder: Prince Sultan bin Mohammed bin Saud Al Kabeer

Recent Moves: The region’s largest food company is in the right place at the right time. Saudi Arabia is the world’s largest importer of broiler meat, mostly chicken, to the tune of 875,000 metric tons in 2013. Domestic competitors like Almarai are ripe for growth. Already, poultry production is on the rise in the kingdom and is expected to swell 52 percent by 2018.

Almarai is showing other signs of international ambition. In partnership with PepsiCo, it launched a $345 million investment in Egypt this June, and its CEO has stated he plans to boost that figure to $560 million in five years. The funds will go toward a new juice factory, a 5,000-cow dairy farm and expanding existing facilities for Egyptian beverage firm Beyti. Drink and eat up!



Read more: OZY - Smarter, Fresher, Different

Where's the Next Arab Spring?

Where's the Next Arab Spring?






It was a time of hope, excitement, change. There were peaceful gatherings and widespread protests, social media came to the forefront as a resistance technique, and leaders toppled in Tunisia, Libya, Egypt and Yemen. For a time, it seemed as if revolution might be sweeping the entire Middle East, with unknown consequences. So whatever happened to the so-called Arab Spring? The biggest beneficiary may surprise you. And looking ahead, what other Arab countries are ripe for revolution? As with all things Middle Eastern, it’s complicated. 

When the Arab revolutions were in their early stages – primarily in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya – hope ran high that a wave of democratic reform would wash across the region. Events kicked off with the Tunisian revolt in late 2010 and crested in Egypt’s Tahrir Square with the overthrow of the Mubarak dictatorship in early 2011. These revolutions were unique in modern Arab history for two reasons: first, they were internally and spontaneously generated and second, they were about universal values and aspirations – a desire for freedom, democratic representation, educational opportunity and decent jobs.

At the time, many people opined that this was very bad news for Al Qaeda and other extremists because the change had come about without the resort to violence that they had long urged.

But as Henry Kissinger presciently remarked in 2011, this was “only Act One of Scene One of a Five Act drama.” I’m not sure what act or scene we are now witnessing, but it is a far cry from the 2010 curtain raiser. The key event since then has been the collapse of the Egyptian revolution – or one might say its reversal, given that the democratically elected government of Islamist Mohammed Morsi was overthrown in a military coup in July, Morsi is now in jail and Mubarak out, and the country appears headed for a new government headed by the Armed Forces chief General Abdel Fatah al-Sissi.


Al Qaeda is now in “I told you so” mode – pushing its narrative that Islamic parties are wasting their time trying to gain power peacefully and democratically.

This turn of events is a gift to Al Qaeda, which is now in “I told you so” mode – pushing its narrative that Islamic parties are wasting their time trying to gain power peacefully and democratically. There will doubtless be other twists and turns in this drama, but for now, the heady early days of the Arab Spring are unlikely to be recaptured. To be sure, the government that replaced Ben Ali in Tunisia survives but is dealing with deep disenchantment and fighting an extremist insurgency in parts of the country. Libya is now ruled by a weak central government that controls little territory and competes for influence with dozens of armed militias. And Syria of course is mired in sectarian war.



So what does all of this mean for Arab countries that managed to avoid revolutionary turmoil – specifically Morocco, Algeria, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia? Given that most Middle East certainties have been blown away in the last two years, predictions are perilous, but let’s take a stab at it. 

First, all of these governments have been sobered by what they’ve seen elsewhere and they have taken steps to head off or blunt similar demands. Second, many of the discontented groups in these societies are probably off balance and divided over strategy in light of what’s happened in Egypt.

1. Morocco

Morocco is the country least likely to experience an upheaval like those we’ve seen. King Muhammed VI has been introducing reforms gradually for a decade, including substantial new rights for women, and in 2011 unveiled a new constitution featuring a democratic parliament and separation of powers – essentially a constitutional monarchy. There are still some protest groups, but they seem unable to gain traction against the backdrop the King has created. 




So what does all of this mean for Arab countries that managed to avoid revolutionary turmoil – specifically Morocco, Algeria, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia? Given that most Middle East certainties have been blown away in the last two years, predictions are perilous, but let’s take a stab at it. 

First, all of these governments have been sobered by what they’ve seen elsewhere and they have taken steps to head off or blunt similar demands. Second, many of the discontented groups in these societies are probably off balance and divided over strategy in light of what’s happened in Egypt.




So what does all of this mean for Arab countries that managed to avoid revolutionary turmoil – specifically Morocco, Algeria, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia? Given that most Middle East certainties have been blown away in the last two years, predictions are perilous, but let’s take a stab at it. 

First, all of these governments have been sobered by what they’ve seen elsewhere and they have taken steps to head off or blunt similar demands. Second, many of the discontented groups in these societies are probably off balance and divided over strategy in light of what’s happened in Egypt.

2. Algeria

Algeria is tougher to assess. Arguably the most authoritarian of Arab countries, and the largest geographically, it has many of the conditions that sparked revolution elsewhere, including high unemployment in a population that is 70 percent under the age of 30. It is also led by rulers who are aged, and in the case of President Boutefika, ill. This said, it has an internal security service that has a proven record of detecting and stamping out dissent. Algeria benefits from sizeable oil and natural gas revenues, and since 2011 the government has spent large sums on improved public services and price supports in an effort to counter dissatisfaction. The bottom line is that Algeria bears close watching because of this finely balanced mix of factors.


What is clear is that most of our earlier assumptions about the Middle East have been turned on their head.

3. Jordan

Jordan is led by a progressive monarch, King Abdullah, who has largely been a modernizing force for his country. He remains broadly popular, and enjoys substantial support from the United States. But his government is under more direct pressure and has fewer resources than most other countries in the region. There is frustration with the slow pace of political reform and with the austerity essential in hard times for Jordan’s resource-poor economy. Added to this are enormous pressures coming from Jordan’s demographics and geography – spillover of both refugees and fighters from the Syrian conflict next door and a teeming Palestinian population disgruntled by its marginal influence in Jordanian politics and lack of progress in the Israeli-Palestinian dispute. There is no doubt the King and his government are walking a perilous tightrope but if I had to bet, I’d say that with ingenuity, a little luck, and continued support from the United States he can navigate through this period. 


4. Saudi Arabia


On the surface, oil-rich Saudi Arabia would seem to be a good candidate for revolution given its highly conservative policies, restrictions on women’s rights, aging royal family and the same sort of “youth bulge” demographics that contributed to rising and frustrated expectations elsewhere in the Arab world. But the 89 year-old King Abdullah has been sensitive to these pressures, appointing a number of competent younger princes to government posts and spreading around literally billions of dollars in projects designed to ease tribal pressures, soothe public concerns and discourage a coalescence of discontent. It’s impossible to rule out a surprise, but the royal family has been defying predictions of its demise for years, and chances are they will do so yet again.

Keeping in mind Kissinger’s caution, it is probably too soon to say the Arab Spring has run its course. But what is clear is that most of our earlier assumptions about the Middle East have been turned on their head. And this virtually guarantees there will be more surprises ahead.

Where's the Next Arab Spring?

Where's the Next Arab Spring?






It was a time of hope, excitement, change. There were peaceful gatherings and widespread protests, social media came to the forefront as a resistance technique, and leaders toppled in Tunisia, Libya, Egypt and Yemen. For a time, it seemed as if revolution might be sweeping the entire Middle East, with unknown consequences. So whatever happened to the so-called Arab Spring? The biggest beneficiary may surprise you. And looking ahead, what other Arab countries are ripe for revolution? As with all things Middle Eastern, it’s complicated. 

When the Arab revolutions were in their early stages – primarily in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya – hope ran high that a wave of democratic reform would wash across the region. Events kicked off with the Tunisian revolt in late 2010 and crested in Egypt’s Tahrir Square with the overthrow of the Mubarak dictatorship in early 2011. These revolutions were unique in modern Arab history for two reasons: first, they were internally and spontaneously generated and second, they were about universal values and aspirations – a desire for freedom, democratic representation, educational opportunity and decent jobs.

At the time, many people opined that this was very bad news for Al Qaeda and other extremists because the change had come about without the resort to violence that they had long urged.

But as Henry Kissinger presciently remarked in 2011, this was “only Act One of Scene One of a Five Act drama.” I’m not sure what act or scene we are now witnessing, but it is a far cry from the 2010 curtain raiser. The key event since then has been the collapse of the Egyptian revolution – or one might say its reversal, given that the democratically elected government of Islamist Mohammed Morsi was overthrown in a military coup in July, Morsi is now in jail and Mubarak out, and the country appears headed for a new government headed by the Armed Forces chief General Abdel Fatah al-Sissi.


Al Qaeda is now in “I told you so” mode – pushing its narrative that Islamic parties are wasting their time trying to gain power peacefully and democratically.

This turn of events is a gift to Al Qaeda, which is now in “I told you so” mode – pushing its narrative that Islamic parties are wasting their time trying to gain power peacefully and democratically. There will doubtless be other twists and turns in this drama, but for now, the heady early days of the Arab Spring are unlikely to be recaptured. To be sure, the government that replaced Ben Ali in Tunisia survives but is dealing with deep disenchantment and fighting an extremist insurgency in parts of the country. Libya is now ruled by a weak central government that controls little territory and competes for influence with dozens of armed militias. And Syria of course is mired in sectarian war.



So what does all of this mean for Arab countries that managed to avoid revolutionary turmoil – specifically Morocco, Algeria, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia? Given that most Middle East certainties have been blown away in the last two years, predictions are perilous, but let’s take a stab at it. 

First, all of these governments have been sobered by what they’ve seen elsewhere and they have taken steps to head off or blunt similar demands. Second, many of the discontented groups in these societies are probably off balance and divided over strategy in light of what’s happened in Egypt.

1. Morocco

Morocco is the country least likely to experience an upheaval like those we’ve seen. King Muhammed VI has been introducing reforms gradually for a decade, including substantial new rights for women, and in 2011 unveiled a new constitution featuring a democratic parliament and separation of powers – essentially a constitutional monarchy. There are still some protest groups, but they seem unable to gain traction against the backdrop the King has created. 




So what does all of this mean for Arab countries that managed to avoid revolutionary turmoil – specifically Morocco, Algeria, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia? Given that most Middle East certainties have been blown away in the last two years, predictions are perilous, but let’s take a stab at it. 

First, all of these governments have been sobered by what they’ve seen elsewhere and they have taken steps to head off or blunt similar demands. Second, many of the discontented groups in these societies are probably off balance and divided over strategy in light of what’s happened in Egypt.




So what does all of this mean for Arab countries that managed to avoid revolutionary turmoil – specifically Morocco, Algeria, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia? Given that most Middle East certainties have been blown away in the last two years, predictions are perilous, but let’s take a stab at it. 

First, all of these governments have been sobered by what they’ve seen elsewhere and they have taken steps to head off or blunt similar demands. Second, many of the discontented groups in these societies are probably off balance and divided over strategy in light of what’s happened in Egypt.

2. Algeria

Algeria is tougher to assess. Arguably the most authoritarian of Arab countries, and the largest geographically, it has many of the conditions that sparked revolution elsewhere, including high unemployment in a population that is 70 percent under the age of 30. It is also led by rulers who are aged, and in the case of President Boutefika, ill. This said, it has an internal security service that has a proven record of detecting and stamping out dissent. Algeria benefits from sizeable oil and natural gas revenues, and since 2011 the government has spent large sums on improved public services and price supports in an effort to counter dissatisfaction. The bottom line is that Algeria bears close watching because of this finely balanced mix of factors.


What is clear is that most of our earlier assumptions about the Middle East have been turned on their head.

3. Jordan

Jordan is led by a progressive monarch, King Abdullah, who has largely been a modernizing force for his country. He remains broadly popular, and enjoys substantial support from the United States. But his government is under more direct pressure and has fewer resources than most other countries in the region. There is frustration with the slow pace of political reform and with the austerity essential in hard times for Jordan’s resource-poor economy. Added to this are enormous pressures coming from Jordan’s demographics and geography – spillover of both refugees and fighters from the Syrian conflict next door and a teeming Palestinian population disgruntled by its marginal influence in Jordanian politics and lack of progress in the Israeli-Palestinian dispute. There is no doubt the King and his government are walking a perilous tightrope but if I had to bet, I’d say that with ingenuity, a little luck, and continued support from the United States he can navigate through this period. 


4. Saudi Arabia


On the surface, oil-rich Saudi Arabia would seem to be a good candidate for revolution given its highly conservative policies, restrictions on women’s rights, aging royal family and the same sort of “youth bulge” demographics that contributed to rising and frustrated expectations elsewhere in the Arab world. But the 89 year-old King Abdullah has been sensitive to these pressures, appointing a number of competent younger princes to government posts and spreading around literally billions of dollars in projects designed to ease tribal pressures, soothe public concerns and discourage a coalescence of discontent. It’s impossible to rule out a surprise, but the royal family has been defying predictions of its demise for years, and chances are they will do so yet again.

Keeping in mind Kissinger’s caution, it is probably too soon to say the Arab Spring has run its course. But what is clear is that most of our earlier assumptions about the Middle East have been turned on their head. And this virtually guarantees there will be more surprises ahead.